No rational person would ever argue that divorce is a mundane or trifling matter — especially any individual who has ever gone through the process.

In fact, and as is readily perceived by most people, virtually everything about a marital dissolution is singular and bafflingly new.

And often uncomfortable.

Which means that venting about discomfiture — whether that relates to negotiating snafus regarding a parenting plan and child visitation, support-related issues, an equitable division of marital assets, your soon-to-be partner’s perceived bad behavior or anything else — is an understandable inclination.

As noted by a divorce columnist in a recent article focused upon the propensity of many divorcing people to air divorce-related grievances on the Internet, the ready accessibility of sites such as Facebook for venting can bring some serious problems.

To wit: The audience for revealed scorn, indignation, unbridled emotionalism and other passions can be flatly huge and include large numbers of people who are not actually friends in the true sense of that word.

And it might be a good idea for some avidly posting people to remember these two points: Once information is “out there,” it can be sent along to an unfathomably wide universe of recipients, and the data available for viewing can stay online seemingly forever.

“Inviting other people into your life by sharing intimate details will only make things messier and more hurtful,” notes the above writer.

It’s understandable that a divorcing party might need to reach out and confide in someone else occasionally concerning developments in the divorce process.

The bottom line: That’s what trusted family members and truly inner-circle friends are for.